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ARRRGGGGHHHHH

So update on the Knedliky recipe. I'm seriously wanting to find out who to write a complaint to at the Post Express. I went to Sutton Place, Harris Teeter and Trader Joes. The consensus is that (surprise!) plums, especially Italian ones are out of season. The produce guy at H.T. recommended using cherries instead so I got some of those, and then I managed to find some huge Californian plums at TJ's. I figure I can quarter them and try them.

Also, while reading the recipe I found that it calls for 4 ounces fromage blanc. For those who are wondering formage blanc litterally translates to "white cheese." I was unable to find anything so labeled in any of the stores I went to. I decided to come back here and do some research.


While I was researching my options on the web I found another copy of the recipe here. Turns out it is from an AP article so it looks like it's all over the place. That doesn't solve the problems with the recipe. On reading the article I found this:
Sweet knedliky won me over immediately. The dough can be made with semolina flour as well as with cottage cheese, quark (a slightly tangy curd cheese) or cooked potatoes.

In my favorite version, whole fruits, particularly small oval plums or sour cherries, are wrapped inside quark-based dough and then boiled. For cooks in the United States, mascarpone or fromage blanc are good substitutes for the quark. Browned butter and cinnamon-scented powdered sugar then are spooned over the hot dumplings.


I found a listing for Quark here saying that I should look at Look for it in large health food stores, specialty stores, and markets.

I found a listing on the Vermont Butter & Cheese Company which really doesn't give me much hope. Then I found a recipe on The Food Network website to Formage Blanc.


Recipe courtesy Emeril Lagasse, 2002


Recipe Summary
Prep Time: 10 minutes Cook Time: 10 minutes
Inactive Prep Time: 45 minutes Yield: about 1 pound (2 cups)
2 quarts whole milk, as fresh as possible
1 cup heavy cream (optional)
2 cups fresh buttermilk
2 tablespoons fresh lemon juice, strained
1/4 to 1/2 teaspoon salt, if desired
Heavy Cream, for serving

In a large, heavy saucepan, add the milk and the cream for a richer fromage blanc. In a mixing bowl, combine the buttermilk and lemon juice and stir to combine well. Add the buttermilk-lemon juice mixture to the milk and begin to heat the milk, over low heat and very slowly, to 175 degrees F. While the milk is heating, stir only twice, making 2 strokes each time, with a heat-proof spatula or other flat utensil. Check the temperature often. As soon as the temperature reaches 175 degrees F, remove the pot from the heat and allow to sit, undisturbed, for 10 minutes.
Line a large colander with 2 layers of fine cheesecloth and set over a large bowl. Gently ladle the curds and whey into the colander and allow to drain until the drips of whey slows, about 2 minutes. Tie the corners of the cheesecloth together to form a hanging pouch, and hang pouch over a bowl and allow to drain until the cheese reaches the desired consistency.

Serve as is, with preserves, honey or fresh fruit, or add salt or fresh herbs, to taste, and enjoy as a savory appetizer. If a rich cheese is desired, spoon or pour a bit of heavy cream over the top before serving. Also, if a very smooth product is desired, beat the cheese briefly with an electric mixer before serving.

Refrigerate until ready to serve, up to 1 week. If cheese is marinated in oil with fresh herbs, it will keep, refrigerated, for up to 1 month.


This sounds like far too big a project for this weekend.

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Orlaith Carey
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